Anti-Inflammatory Carrot & Ginger Soup

This soup uses two herbs from the ginger plant family - ginger and turmeric. The oils in these ingredients are loaded with antioxidants; promote circulation and aid in digestion.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp. ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 medium brown onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¾ inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
  • ½ inch fresh turmeric, peeled and sliced
  • 1 long red chili, diced
  • 1 ½ pounds carrots, washed and roughly chopped
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 2-inch lengths of lemongrass stalks

Instructions:

  1. Heat ghee or coconut oil in saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add garlic, ginger, turmeric and chili and cook for another 5 minutes, or until softened and aromatic.
  2. Add carrots and stock, and then place lemongrass lengths into the soup. Bring mixture to a boil, and lower heat to simmer for 15-20 minutes until carrots are softened.
  3. Remove lemongrass stalks and discard. Blend soup in batches in a high-powered blender or process with an immersion blender until smooth.
  4. Enjoy this soup on cold winter days to aid with inflammation.

 

 


Are you suffering from Inflammation?

5 Inflammation-Causing Foods and 1 Easy Fix

The subject of Inflammation has been in the news quite a lot lately, and for good reason. Inflammation plays a role in most of the chronic diseases we see today, including heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and even acne!

Temporary inflammation is good—our bodies depend on inflammatory processes to heal injuries and fight off infection. But when acute inflammation turns chronic, the immune system starts attacking normal cells and the normal healing process turns harmful.

One great way to reduce inflammation is to reduce or remove the following 5 inflammation producing foods from your diet. But sometimes that isn’t enough. Read to the end to discover my go-to solution for inflammation!

  1. Sugar

Sugar is at the top of my list for inflammatory foods, and it’s one of the most prevalent in our diets. The average American consumes 32 teaspoons of added sugars daily! This increased sugar consumption releases inflammatory messengers called cytokines which can wreak havoc in your body. To avoid sugars, eat whole, non-processed foods. When you do eat processed foods, read the labels to avoid any word ending in “ose” such as fructose or sucrose.

  1. Trans Fats

Trans fats are known to trigger systemic inflammation, and even small quantities can be problematic. Most trans fats are found in fast foods, processed snack foods, cookies, doughnuts, and most stick margarines. Check food labels for the presence of trans fats, but be aware that food products with less than 0.5 grams per serving do not need to list trans fat on the food label. Instead check the ingredient list for partially hydrogenated oils—these are a sure sign that trans fats are present.

  1. Oils with Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Though our bodies need omega 6 fatty acids for normal growth and development, we often don’t get a good balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Eat too many foods containing omega-6 fatty acids and the body starts to produce pro-inflammatory chemicals. Avoid cooking with oils such as corn, safflower, sunflower, soy, peanut, and vegetable. You may also find these oils in mayonnaise and salad dressings.

  1. Refined Carbohydrates

Foods made with white flour, white rice, and white potatoes, as well as many other cereal grains have high levels of refined carbohydrates. Processed carbohydrates send your blood sugar into the stratosphere, and also create advanced glycation end (AGE) products that boost inflammation. Picture a candied apple: the sugar that forms around the apple hardens in the same way that advanced glycation products harden around nerves and arterioles, restricting blood supply and creating dysfunction.

  1. Gluten and casein

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley whereas casein is found in dairy products. Both substances can promote inflammation and should be avoided, especially by people who are prone to inflammation.

While you should work to remove these inflammatory foods from your diet, no one eats perfectly 100% of the time. Even if your diet is perfect, often stressors and environmental toxins can lead to inflammation.

1 Easy Fix

One of the products I love to use with people who suffer from inflammation is Omax3 Professional Strength, a professional strength omega-3 supplement. The omega-3 oils in this supplement were developed by Yale University-affiliated physicians, and contain a balanced 4:1 ratio of EPA to DHA (two omega-3 fatty acids) which research shows is the best ratio to reduce inflammation.

Clinical research shows that the omega-3 in Omax3 Professional Strength reduces joint discomfort and increases mobility, improves mood health, and enhances cognitive function. This supplement has also been shown to significantly improve cardiovascular risk factors. In one 3-month study, patients experienced a 31% reduction in triglycerides, a 13% reduction in total cholesterol, an 11% reduction in LDL, and a 9.8% improvement in cholesterol/HDL ratio.

The main reason that I recommend Omax3 Professional Strength over other omega-3 supplements is its purity. If you want to test your omega-3 supplement for purity, place it in the freezer for 24 hours. While Omax3 Professional Strength stays clear, other omega-3 supplements cloud over with impurities such as saturated fats, omega-6 fats, and toxins like mercury, lead, and PCBs.

Along with removing inflammation-causing foods from your diet, the omega-3 fatty acids in Omax3 Professional Strength will help reduce inflammation in your body and reduce your risk of chronic disease!


Valentine's Day Special

Give the perfect Valentine's gift!

Did you know that far infrared sauna therapy is not only great stress relief, but also increases cardiac output and metabolic rate?

Give the gift of health!

Click below on the Sauna Special, pay for 4, 30-minute far infrared sauna sessions and receive a 5th session on us!

SAUNA SPECIAL


Celebrate Hearth Health!

6 Things You Can Do For Your Heart Today

Most of us take active steps to avoid cancer—we try to eat right, watch our sun exposure, and have regular check-ups with our physicians. But what have you done lately for the #1 killer of both men and women in America—heart disease? Sure, you don’t smoke, don’t drink alcohol excessively, watch your diet and exercise, but are you really doing what counts? Check out these small, evidence-based tricks and tips to benefit your heart starting today.

1. Invest in Supportive Relationships

We all know that having loving, supportive relationships feels great, but did you know it directly affects heart health? In one recent study, people with high levels of supportive relationships were significantly less likely to increase their body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. People with high negative relationships had a 10+ percent increase in waist circumference, as well as increased BMI. Higher BMI readings and waist circumference are significant risk factors for heart disease, so it appears that investing in good relationships with loved ones not only feels great but benefits your heart.

2. Eat Healthy Fats

For years, fats have gotten a bad rap, but in the last 5-10 years, there is increasing evidence that our fear of fats was unfounded, especially healthy fats. Fats are essential for whole body health, and are especially critical to your heart and brain.

Try to include sources of healthy fat in your diet, such as coconut oil, avocado, olive oil, ghee, nuts and seeds, butter sourced from grass-fed cows, and foods containing omega-3 fatty acids.

Fish, particularly fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, lake trout, sardines, or herring have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, a substance which benefits the heart greatly. Omega-3’s reduce the risk of abnormal heart beats, reduce triglyceride levels, slow the growth of plaque in the blood vessels, and lower blood pressure. I generally recommend 2-3 servings (approximately ¾ cup flaked fish) per week to get the optimum benefits.

Of course, some kinds of fish contain high levels of mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and other toxic chemicals. Try to stay away from larger fish such as shark, king mackerel, or swordfish, as they have had longer to accumulate these substances.
Watch for our next newsletter which will contain an in-depth analysis of omega-3 supplements.

3. Boost Your Exercise Routine with Interval Training

Interval training pairs short bursts of vigorous activity with brief periods of rest, and has been shown to increase oxygenation, reduce cardiovascular risk factors, and reduce blood sugar levels. Interval training also improves endothelial function, which is closely linked to cardiovascular health (the endothelium is the inner lining of blood vessels).

If you don’t exercise already, start slowly with a 20-minute walk around the block 3-5 days/week. As your endurance improves, add 1-2 minute bursts of faster, more vigorous walking followed by 30 seconds of slower walking. Alternate between the bursts of activity (A) with rest periods of slower walking (B) so your workout has an ABAB pattern.

If you already have an exercise plan in place, add more formal interval training to your workout. I like this video designed for beginners, but if you want something more vigorous, search online for “interval training for cardiovascular fitness.”

4. Rethink Your Stress

I’m sure you’re heard a lot of evidence that chronic stress can damage your heart—and you’re not alone in that belief. More than 80 percent of American adults think that stress can have a strong or very strong impact on health, and 94 percent believe that stress contributes to the development of illnesses like heart disease, obesity, and depression.

And while there is plentiful evidence to support the chronic stress/disease connection, what if focusing on the negative impact of stress makes it worse?

Research published in the European Heart Journal found that those who believed stress heavily affected their health had a 50 percent greater risk of dying from heart attack! Remember, this study was not looking at the presence or absence of stress in participants lives, rather it was linked how people thought about stress to their cardiovascular outcomes.

One way to change your mindset is to watch the work of Alia Crum, in particular her Ted Talk on stress mindsets. I also recommend reading Stanford Psychologist Kelly McGonigal’s book The Upside of Stress. This book will help you see how stress can make you “stronger, smarter, and happier” if you can change your mindset and embrace it.

5. Consider Vitamin K2

Vitamin K2 is likely the most important nutrient you’ve never heard of. While you may be familiar with vitamin K1, the nutrient that helps our blood clot, K2 is greatly unfamiliar to most people. Research has shown K2 to be important for many diseases, including osteoporosis, diabetes, and even cancer. But I find the most promise in using K2 for heart health.

At one point, researchers thought that osteoporosis and calcification of the blood vessels to be unrelated conditions, but there is increasing evidence that a deficiency of vitamin K2 may be at the heart of both!

Without K2, your body can’t activate Matrix Gla Protein (MGP), a substance that inhibits tissue calcification. In other words, without K2, your body sends calcium to your blood vessels, rather than to your bones where it belongs.

There are a number of different forms of vitamin K2, the one that is best absorbed and most stable is K2-7 (also known as MK-7 or menaquinone-7). Typical doses range from 45 mcg to 320 mcg/day, and the most compelling research on K2 and heart health show significant benefit in a higher dose. Most of the vitamin K2 supplements use a K2 source that degrades quickly in the capsule, unfortunately resulting in much lower levels of K2 than claimed on the labels. In our research, only supplements with K2 sourced from MenaquinGold were found to have as much K2 present in the supplement as was promised on the label.

6. Get Tested

The blood work most commonly prescribed at your yearly physical (CBC, CMP, and lipid panel) is far from complete where your heart health is concerned. I encourage all of my patients to have a yearly enhanced cardio metabolic panel, which includes an expanded lipid panel that measures the density and number of lipoproteins, vascular inflammation markers including CRP and homocysteine, and metabolic risk factors such as insulin, hA1c, adiponectin, and c-peptides.

In the office, we offer a complete CardioMetabolic panel from SpectraCell Labs because it is the most comprehensive assessment cardiovascular health we have ever seen. To read more about our favorite test for heart health, click here. In honor of Heart Health Month, SpectraCell Labs is offering a February-only price of $10 for the CardioMetabolic panel when combined with the Micronutrient Panel (a combined price of $190).

It’s never too late to help your heart. Small, incremental changes can make a huge impact on your heart disease risk, as well as on your overall health.


Moqueca-Brazilian Fish Stew

This fish stew was easy to make and delicious. Taken from one of my favorite sites SimplyRecipes.com, I am sure you will enjoy it!
 Bon Appetit!

 Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 to 2 lbs. of fillets of firm white fish such as halibut, swordfish, or cod, rinsed in cold water, pin bones removed, cut into large portions
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 Tbsp. lime or lemon juice
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped spring onion, or 1 medium yellow onion, chopped or sliced
  • 1/4 cup green onion greens, chopped
  • 1/2 yellow and 1/2 red bell pepper, seeded, de-stemmed, chopped (or sliced)
  • 2 cups chopped (or sliced) tomatoes
  • 1 Tbsp. paprika (Hungarian sweet)
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 large bunch of cilantro, chopped with some set aside for garnish
  • 1 14-ounce can coconut milk

Directions:

  1. Place fish pieces in a bowl; add the minced garlic and lime juice so that the pieces are well coated. Sprinkle generously all over with salt and pepper. Keep chilled while preparing the rest of the soup.
  2. In a large covered pan (such as a Dutch oven), coat the bottom with about 2 Tbsp. of olive oil and heat on medium heat. Add the chopped onion and cook a few minutes until softened. Add the bell pepper, paprika, and red pepper flakes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. (At least a teaspoon of salt.) Cook for a few minutes longer, until the bell pepper begins to soften. Stir in the chopped tomatoes and onion greens. Bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, uncovered. Stir in the chopped cilantro.
  3. Use a large spoon to remove about half of the vegetables (you'll put them right back in). Spread the remaining vegetables over the bottom of the pan to create a bed for the fish. Arrange the fish pieces on the vegetables. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Then add back the previously removed vegetables, covering the fish. Pour coconut milk over the fish and vegetables.
  4. Bring soup to a simmer, reduce the heat, cover, and let simmer for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings. You may need to add more salt (likely), lime or lemon juice, paprika, pepper, or chili flakes to get the soup to the desired seasoning for your taste.
  5. Garnish with cilantro.

 


Chicken Enchilada Casserole

This delicious Chicken Enchilada Casserole dinner recipe is borrowed from one of my favorite paleo sites;  Swiss Paleo. Bayne kids tested and approved!

Ingredients:

For the sauce:

  •   4 cloves of garlic
  •   1 green bell pepper
  •   1 onion
  •   3 red Thai chilis
  •   12oz. can of canned tomatoes
  •   1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  •   1/2 teaspoon dry oregano
  •   1 scallion (or use more onion)
  •   2 Tablespoons of ghee (or butter)
  •   1 cup of chicken broth
  •   2 Tablespoons tomato paste
  •   1/2 teaspoon salt

For the filling:

  •  12 oz. of cooked chicken, shredded or chopped
  •  1 red bell pepper. chopped
  •  1 onion, sliced
  •  Shredded cheese of your choice

Instructions:

For the sauce:

  1. Chop the garlic, bell pepper, onion, scallion and chilies.
  2. Fry them up in the ghee (butter) until the onions and scallions are translucent.
  3. Add the cumin and oregano and cook for about 1 minute.
  4. Then add the canned tomatoes, tomato paste, broth and salt.
  5. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  6. Pour into a blender and whiz until smooth.
For the filling:
  1. Fry the red bell pepper and onion together in a frying pan with a little bit of ghee until tender.
  2. Add in the chopped or shredded cooked chicken.

Putting it all together:

  1. Spoon 1/3 of the sauce into the bottom of a casserole dish.
  2. Add a layer of filling.
  3. Repeat sauce and filling layers until you run out. Top with grated cheese (optional).
  4. Bake in a pre-heated 375 degree oven for 20-30 minutes or until bubbly
  5. Garnish with fresh cilantro and enjoy!

Paleo Thanksgiving

With Thanksgiving rapidly approaching, I wanted to share what the Bayne family will be feasting on this year. Check out the “Nomstastic Paleo Thanksgiving Menu" deliciously put together by one of my favorite paleo bloggers and Chef Michelle Tam from Nom Nom Paleo. Enjoy!


Featured Products

Thanksgiving is frequently a time where we tend to overindulge. Make sure you have PureBalance Liver Support and/or Pancnzyme handy. Both products help boost metabolism and aid in digestion and detoxification.


Product of the Month

Vitamin K2 is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a critical role in your bone health by facilitating the transport of calcium from the bloodstream into the bones.

Without enough vitamin K2, calcium in the blood does not adequately bind to bone and instead infiltrates into the arterial wall, resulting in calcification, or arteriosclerosis.  Adequate amounts of K2 will simultaneously improve bone health and heart health by directing calcium to its proper spot in your bones!

Vitamin K2 is found in meat, organ meats, eggs and dairy products and is also made by bacteria in our digestive tract. Dietary vitamin K2 is found almost exclusively in the MK-4 version, which has a very short half-life in the body, approximately 6 hours. To supplement your diet, improve bone and cardiovascular health, or to speed healing from a fracture we suggest the MK-7 form of K2, which stays in the body up to 6x longer than MK-4.

Vitamin D3 has become a very popular supplement for bone health. Did you know that vitamin D3 and vitamin K2 work synergistically to improve bone health? In fact high doses of vitamin D3 actually depletes you K2 levels leading to continued bone loss. If you are taking vitamin D3 through the winter be sure to also supplement vitamin K2.

Recent research has also shown vitamin K2 to be very important in the healing of neuropathy as well as improved endurance in athletes.

The quality of your K2 supplement is very important. There are poor quality K2 products being produced in China and Italy that are flooding the market. We only recommend MennaquinGold Vitamin K2 since it is the only pharmaceutical grade vitamin k2 in the marketplace.

Get your Vitamin K2 next time you are at PureBalance …your bones and heart will love you for it!


Coconut Pancakes

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients and let sit for five minutes. Add more coconut milk if you find batter is too thick.
  2. Add coconut oil or butter to a pan and heat over medium heat.
  3. Pour about 1 cup of batter for each pancake, allowing each side to brown before flipping it. Serves 2-4.

If you want some healthy and delicious additions to your pancakes, add a few blueberries, bananas, crushed pecans, or walnut pieces immediately after pouring the batter in the pan.

Instead of using all coconut flour, you can also experiment with using half coconut flour and half almond flour, which, in my opinion, makes a very balanced flavor.